Disney princesses get a dose of harsh reality courtesy of photographer Dina Goldstein

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It’s not the "happily ever after" you’d expect of a picture-perfect Disney princess. In Dina Goldstein’s “Fallen Princesses” series, the photographer captures a modern-day take on the struggles these ladies might encounter in real life.
Snow White doesn’t have the dwarfs to help keep up the house and to watch the kids. Meanwhile, her prince sips and snacks through a heated TV sports match.
  • Snow White doesn’t have the dwarfs to help keep up the house and to watch the kids. Meanwhile, her prince sips and snacks through a heated TV sports match.
Snow White doesn’t have the dwarfs to help keep up the house and to watch the kids. Meanwhile, her prince sips and snacks through a heated TV sports match. Next: Rapunzel lets down her hair.

Rapunzel really let down her hair (and her spirits) after a few rounds of chemo.
  • Rapunzel really let down her hair (and her spirits) after a few rounds of chemo.
Rapunzel really let down her hair (and her spirits) after a few rounds of chemo.

Next: Jasmine gets caught up in the Arab Spring.

Jasmine needs more than a pet tiger to escape the turmoil of the Arab Spring.
  • Jasmine needs more than a pet tiger to escape the turmoil of the Arab Spring.
Jasmine needs more than a pet tiger to escape the turmoil of the Arab Spring.

Next: Belle takes extraordinary measures to keep her beauty.

Belle undergoes plastic surgery in order to keep up on her beautiful good looks.
  • Belle undergoes plastic surgery in order to keep up on her beautiful good looks.
Belle undergoes plastic surgery in order to keep up on her beautiful good looks. The complete conceptual series of Fallen Princesses photographs can be purchased through Dina Goldstein’s website. You might also peruse her “In the Dollhouse” series, where she depicts the everyday life of Barbie and Ken.

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