In Your Queue: Idiots all around us

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Frances Ha - Noah Baumbach

At certain age benchmarks we tend to change, usually rapidly. Thirteen, eighteen, twenty one, thirty -- they are times in our lives where we might change our clothes or the kind of music we listen to, the kind of people we want to be when we grow up. Sometimes we change friends, sometimes best friends at that. Frances Ha is about just that, slow dissolution of a best friendship between Frances (Greta Gerwig) and Sophie (Mickey Sumner) as they come frighteningly close to reaching 30. They are the kind of friends who describe each other as "the same person with different hair", roomates with no boundaries but with no boundary issues either. They are the new Oscar and Felix, until Sophie decides to leave Frances and move in with her boyfriend.

After a certain age making new friends is a difficult thing. You're used to being you without a filter. That you can be too much for a new person, but the filter makes you boring. Frances's new reality is full of people, but none of whom she really connects to, with or without a filter. The idea of two ships passing in the night comes to mind, but Frances Ha is more like two ships passing in the daytime. It's a stark and funny, a well observed portrait of friendship and moving on, but a little bit painful to watch if you're around 30, as one ship sails so smoothly from port while the other --  the graceful dancer -- sputters in circles helplessly with no life jacket to rely on. (Available to stream)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqMaeBtK9TA

Dealin' With Idiots - Jeff Garlin

This is probably the strangest recommendation for a movie that I'll ever write. It is, essentially a giant spoiler, but for an improv comedy feature, the trailer ruins more than what I'm about to say, which is: this movie is not that good. If they made an episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm about psycho baseball parents, but did it without Larry David, this is what it might be like. It's flat and only occasionally funny. Often, in fact, it is brutally unfunny, and even JB Smoove and Bob Odenkirk fall on their faces a little in this movie -- that's the big risk with improv -- but it is 100% worth watching because the ending absolutely pays off on the promise that the film's core idea is about. The ending is actually kind of genius, the way everything falls apart so perfectly and idiocy is so well confronted. So that's my strange recommendation, to stick with this film through the ending. Fast forward through scenes if you need to, but stick with it because it's so, so worth it. (Available to stream)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hEsezVzQHoQ

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