Celebrate the 20th anniversary of Sapphire Supper Club’s grand opening

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Sapphire Supper Sapphire Supper Club, 1998, via Kick Bright Zine

On April 1, 1994, Sapphire Supper Club - the venue that we now know as the Social - opened its doors and welcomed in a music scene that fostered local acts like Terri Binion, Steve Foxbury, Brian Chodorcoff, Eugene Snowden, Jeff Nolan and so many more, plus featured much-loved Georgia bands like Donkey and Drivin' n' Cryin'. And now, the community that swarmed to those shows is getting super nostalgic and wants to take a night to remember it all on the 20th anniversary of the venue's opening night.

At 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 2, head down to the Social to join in and perhaps elevate your Orlando music fan status (or as Jason Ferguson might put it, discover the ancients) to see all the above-mentioned acts, plus Thomas and Olivia Wynn, Cherlene and Joseph and Jesse Lynn Martens (more TBA). (RVSP here)

Here's a lil history lesson:

For those who remember the Sapphire Supper Club, you might get a kick out of reading this Scott Joseph review from 1995, where he finds it "difficult to recommend."

Do you remember the last show you saw at Sapphire Supper Club or the first show you saw at the Social? I'm finding it just as "difficult" to track down exactly when the transition happened, although most of the Internet seems to agree it was sometime in 2002.

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