Orlando Fringe Review: Something's Weird in Weeki Wachee

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The Pattershaw sisters (Elizabeth Murff and Peg O'Keef) have left the glamorous days of mermaid show business behind them and now live a secluded life full of pickled memories and fruit - they sell pickled fruit preserves to pay the bills - until one day their hermitage is invaded by their fabulously gay nephew (John Ryan) who needs a place to stay and regroup for the summer - and the plot thickens!

Ripe with mermaids, murder and ghostly-gay kisses in the dark of the night, this play is pure magic. From the moment the curtains fell, the audience was spellbound. All the two actresses had to do was flip a fin and the crowd would go wild.  A great script, penned by 7-year Fringe veteran John Ryan, coupled with the stage muscles of Murff and O'Keef, channeled through the directing chops of Christian Kelty (the talent behind last year's Neil Gaiman-esque The Boy Who Stole the Sun) was an obvious recipe for success. Fringe newcomer Ryan Dowd Urch as Monty was bubbling with otherworldly charm  and sensuality and is sure to be the #fringecrush of 2014, although John Ryan spending half the play in his little box-cut briefs is sure to make you get the vapors as well.

Campy, dark dramedies like Weeki Wachee always do well at Fringe so be sure to get your tickets early before it inevitably sells out.

Something's Weird in Weeki Wachee

Length: 75

Venue: Orange

Price: $11

Rating: 13 +

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