Edward Snowden leaks new intelligence to NBC Nightly News

by

comment

via
  • via

via

The infamous NSA whistleblower currently seeking political asylum in Russia, Edward Snowden, is leaking new intelligence to NBC Nightly News anchor, Brian Williams.  The one-hour interview, Snowden's first with a U.S. television network, will air at 10 p.m. on Wednesday.

In an excerpt that aired Tuesday night, the document leaker says he trained as a spy. Claiming to be 007 is not unfathomable, considering he worked his way into the most secretive computers in U.S. intelligence. Perhaps, Snowden was more than just a defense contractor, and by using NBC as a platform, he can defend his intelligence career.

“I was trained as a spy in sort of the traditional sense of the word — in that I lived and worked undercover, overseas, pretending to work in a job that I'm not — and even being assigned a name that was not mine," Snowden told NBC.

Snowden also reveals to Williams that he worked undercover for the CIA, NSA, and Defense Intelligence Agency. Snowden also says the government is misleading when labeling him as a low-level systems administrator.

“Now, the government might deny these things,” Snowden told NBC. “But what they're trying to do is they're trying to use one position that I've had in a career, here or there, to distract from the totality of my experience.”

Williams conducted the interview in Moscow, where Snowden fled last summer to avoid prosecution in the U.S. on espionage charges. Snowden’s leak of classified document on U.S. surveillance programs sparked a national debate about privacy and security. While President Barack Obama and military officials remain supportive of mass surveillance, technology companies and civil libertarians oppose the lack of transparency.

Question fugitive’s employment history tonight on WESH-Channel 2 and determine if Snowden was merely a hacker or a runaway James Bond.

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Orlando Weekly. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Orlando Weekly, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at feedback@orlandoweekly.com.

Orlando Weekly works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Central Florida.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Orlando’s true free press free.