This Little Underground: Tennis & Pure Bathing Culture @ The Social

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This Little Underground is Orlando Weekly's music column providing perspective, live reviews and news on the city's music scene. Read the latest column here.

Tennis at the Social (photo by James Dechert)
  • Tennis at the Social (photo by James Dechert)
Tennis at the Social (photo by James Dechert) Denver’s Tennis jumped onto the scene as one of the sharpest bands of the great Indie-Pop Oldies Revival Rush of 2011. Though those era signatures aren’t really in play with their newer material, that sweet little trend held a particularly complementary perfection for their approach to pop music. However, this recent full-band performance (Sept. 22, The Social) was assurance that their crystal-cut melodies haven’t gone anywhere. Tennis hasn’t been here since they first emerged, and in that time they’ve traded in the ‘50s pop and absorbed a whole lot of the cosmopolitan soul and R&B of the ‘80s. In fact, singer and heart of the band Alaina Moore has sprouted an extraordinary amount of soft but real soul in her singing.
Tennis at the Social (photo by James Dechert)
  • Tennis at the Social (photo by James Dechert)
Tennis at the Social (photo by James Dechert) Even without the brightness and purity of oldies hooks, their songwriting remains concise, efficient and effective with a deadly hit/miss ratio. Despite the disposability that’s often – and mistakenly – associated with pop sweetness, these pop classicists have proven their craft with sustained precision.
Pure Bathing Culture at the Social (photo by James Dechert)
  • Pure Bathing Culture at the Social (photo by James Dechert)
Pure Bathing Culture at the Social (photo by James Dechert) There’s much to like about how Portland opener Pure Bathing Culture manages their space – a finespun convergence of dream pop and sophisti-pop – on the music spectrum. These Vetiver alums breeze on chillwave’s floating midnight frequencies but thankfully step with much more conviction, purpose and golden West Coast rays to give everything some presence and pulse. You know, like a real pop band. Their Orlando debut was distilled and lovely. At once clear and supple, the sonic simplicity behind Pure Bathing Culture is a thing not of rudiments but of judiciousness and tasteful economy.

Read more This Little Underground:

DJ Shadow & Cut Chemist play Afrika Bambaataa
  • DJ Shadow & Cut Chemist play Afrika Bambaataa
DJ Shadow & Cut Chemist play Afrika Bambaataa

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