Florida man buys foreclosed home ... with dead body inside

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Image via Google Maps
  • Image via Google Maps

Image via Google Maps

Earlier this month, William Wilson purchased a foreclosure home at an auction in Cape Coral, but ended up with a lot more than a Florida home left in disarray. Along with photographs on the fridge and boxes filled for moving, when Wilson entered his new property for the first time, he was greeted with a dead body in the master bedroom.

When Wilson discovered the body, he called 911. You can listen to that call below:

According to News Press, the interior of the home was "like a time capsule, full of boxes, files of paper, shredded trash, old food, pizza boxes and bird feces. He said the mummified body had been eaten, whether by cockroaches or by a pet bird that lived after the individual passed."

Neighbors say the woman who lived in the home hadn't been seen in years. Code enforcement had been called on the property numerous times and the Cape Coral Police Department had checked the house twice in early 2013, but from the exterior, the house "looked OK."

Let this be a lesson to always do a walk-through before buying a house.

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