Curious how that huge Maya Lin installation came together? Check out how it comes apart

by

comment
"2 x 4 Landscape," 2006, © Maya Lin, courtesy Pace Gallery. Photography by Colleen Chartier.
  • "2 x 4 Landscape," 2006, © Maya Lin, courtesy Pace Gallery. Photography by Colleen Chartier.

Sadly, the amazing Maya Lin exhibition, A History of Water, closed at Orlando Museum of Art Sunday. We were so impressed with this show, the first major Maya Lin exhibition in Florida and the first show to take over every gallery at OMA, that we covered it with not one but three overlapping reviews back in March.

The centerpiece of A History of Water was the room-size "2 x 4 Landscape," an undulating waveform built of thousands of individual lumber studs. The overwhelming first impression that "2 x 4" makes ultimately gives way to a curiosity about its construction – a curiosity OMA satisfied today with a series of photos of the piece's de-installation.



Check out a few frames from this look behind the OMA scenes (see more at their Facebook page), and rev up your anticipation for OMA's next major show — the second installation of the Florida Prize in Contemporary Art

PHOTO VIA OMA ON FACEBOOK
  • photo via OMA on Facebook

PHOTO VIA OMA ON FACEBOOK
  • photo via OMA on Facebook

PHOTO VIA OMA ON FACEBOOK
  • photo via OMA on Facebook

PHOTO VIA OMA ON FACEBOOK
  • photo via OMA on Facebook

PHOTO VIA OMA ON FACEBOOK
  • photo via OMA on Facebook

PHOTO VIA OMA ON FACEBOOK
  • photo via OMA on Facebook



We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Orlando Weekly. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Orlando Weekly, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at feedback@orlandoweekly.com.

Support Local Journalism.
Join the Orlando Weekly Press Club

Local journalism is information. Information is power. And we believe everyone deserves access to accurate independent coverage of their community and state. Our readers helped us continue this coverage in 2020, and we are so grateful for the support.

Help us keep this coverage going in 2021. Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing membership pledge, your support goes to local-based reporting from our small but mighty team.

Join the Orlando Weekly Press Club for as little as $5 a month.