Catch 'Roar,' one of the most disaster-prone movies ever made, at the Enzian this weekend

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Lions are dangerous. This seems like a given. Not so for producer Noel Marshall and his wife, Tippi Hedren. In the 1970’s, they amassed a collection of more than 100 lions and lived with the pack on a ranch outside of L.A., eventually deciding to shoot a movie using their big cat collection. That film, 1981’s Roar – to the surprise of absolutely no one – became known as the most dangerous film ever made. While no animals were harmed in the production, there were more than 70 animal attacks on cast and crew. Hedren’s 14-year-old daughter, Melanie Griffith, had to have reconstructive surgery after taking lion teeth to the face, and Marshall himself was bitten so many times that he developed gangrene. The movie was a failure when it was first released, but Drafthouse Films is bringing it back to theaters for a limited engagement so a whole new generation can vicariously live through one of the worst decisions ever put on film.

11:59 p.m. Friday and Saturday, July 10-11 | Enzian Theater, 1300 S. Orlando Ave., Maitland | 407-629-0054 | enzian.org | $10


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