Orlando Speaks brings police, community together at Edgewater High School

by

comment
PHOTO VIA ORLANDO POLICE
  • Photo via Orlando Police

City officials and the Orlando Police Department hosted the second installment of Orlando Speaks Tuesday night at Edgewater High School in College Park. Facilitated by the Valencia College Peace and Justice Institute, the event wasn't very different from the first Orlando Speaks in August, says Linda Shrieves Beaty, a spokeswoman for the college. 

"The content is exactly the same, but they have tinkered with the time a bit based on participant feedback," she says. "People at the tables wanted more time to talk to one another." 



Mayor Buddy Dyer and OPD Chief John Mina were both in attendance and asked about recent excessive force cases in the city. 

"We have held [police officers] accountable," Dyer says. "It’s unacceptable to have excessive force but we’re probably one of the most proactive police departments in the entire country. Any use of force by an officer is investigated by his sergeant. 



The city pays the Institute about $2,000 per session, says Marcia Hope Goodwin, chief service officer for the city's Office of Community Affairs and Human Relations. About 170 residents and 35 police officers signed up for the event, and some people were put on a waiting list. People on the list can attend the next Orlando Speaks event, which is being held Feb. 16 in District 4, Goodwin says. 

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Orlando Weekly. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Orlando Weekly, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at feedback@orlandoweekly.com.

Orlando Weekly works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Central Florida.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Orlando’s true free press free.