A hidden safe was found at Pablo Escobar's Miami Beach mansion

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PHOTO VIA MIAMI HERALD/TWITTER
  • Photo via Miami Herald/Twitter
A safe that may have belonged to the Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar was recently unearthed during the demolition of his former Miami Beach mansion. 

At about 11 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 25, construction worker Miguel Mato was operating an excavator when he found a metal combination-locked safe hidden in the concrete foundation of a wall, according to CBS News.  



The new owners of the house, Chicken Kitchen founder Christian de Berdouare and his wife Jennifer Valoppi, said they would take the 2-foot-by-2-foot safe somewhere safe and open it shortly, BBC reported. 

According to BBC, another safe was found by construction workers shortly after demolition work began last week, but it disappeared before anyone could examine it.



The mansion owners — who are legally entitled to all the safe's contents — had the second safe strapped to a flatbed truck and towed to a secure location, where they intend to have it opened Tuesday, Jan. 26, says CBS News. 

Escobar, nicknamed "El Patrón" or "The Boss," bought the property in March 1980 for $762,500, according to Miami-Dade County public records, and de Berdouare acquired the mansion for $9.65 million in 2014.

The Miami Beach property will be under 24-hour security until all rubble is removed.

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