Fringe Review: 'Fruit Flies Like a Banana: Alphabetical Disorder'

by

comment
'Fruit Flies Like a Banana: Alphabetical Disorder' at the Orlando Fringe
  • 'Fruit Flies Like a Banana: Alphabetical Disorder' at the Orlando Fringe
Fruit Flies Like a Banana was my favorite family-friendly show of 2015's Fringe, and the Fourth Wall's follow-up, Alphabetical Disorder, is every bit as delightful. The setup is deviously simple: Each letter of the alphabet represents a different two-minute musical comedy skit in the instrumental ensemble's repertory, and audience members determine the show's running order by selecting vowels and consonants. Pieces range from John Philip Sousa and Mozart to Duke Ellington and Billy Joel, with many modern compositions to balance the classics. 
Fruit Flies Like a Banana: Alphabetical Disorder
The Fourth Wall - Hudson, MA
7 DATES THROUGH MAY 29, 2016
Venue: Green
Length: 60 Min
Price: $11 (Disc: FA | FV | MIL | STU | SR)
Rating: 7 & Up
Buy Tickets
Performers Hilary Abigana (flute), C. Neil Parsons (brass) and Greg Jukes (percussion) all excel as movers as well as musicians. They don't merely play their songs; they give each its own unique comic treatment, blending modern dance, marching band and acrobatics with grin-inducing grace. Fringe has plenty of variety shows, but there's only one where you get to see vibraphone choreography, upside-down hula hooping and Modest Mussorgsky played on accordion and piggyback euphonium. Highly recommended.

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Orlando Weekly. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Orlando Weekly, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at feedback@orlandoweekly.com.

Support Local Journalism.
Join the Orlando Weekly Press Club

Local journalism is information. Information is power. And we believe everyone deserves access to accurate independent coverage of their community and state. Our readers helped us continue this coverage in 2020, and we are so grateful for the support.

Help us keep this coverage going in 2021. Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing membership pledge, your support goes to local-based reporting from our small but mighty team.

Join the Orlando Weekly Press Club for as little as $5 a month.