Florida researchers successfully breed 'Finding Dory' fish in captivity

by

comment
PHOTO VIA CLIFF/FLICKR
  • Photo via Cliff/Flickr
Researchers at the University of Florida say they've successfully bred Dory fish, or Pacific blue tangs, in captivity for the first time ever. 

The fish, which is the main character in Pixar's Finding Dory, traditionally fare poorly in tanks. According to The Wrap, marine biologists have worried that the demand from the film would increase efforts to grab Pacific blue tangs from the wild. 



After Finding Nemo came out in 2003, demand for clown fish rose 40 percent, reports marine biology magazine Hakai

This breakthrough, however, may eventually make it easier for Pacific blue tangs to make the transition to home aquariums and exhibits, without putting stress on wild populations. 



According to ABC News, Rising Tide Conservation, the SeaWorld-Busch Gardens Conservation Fund and the Oceanic Institute of Hawaii Pacific University also contributed to the project. 

Tags

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Orlando Weekly. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Orlando Weekly, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at feedback@orlandoweekly.com.

Support Local Journalism.
Join the Orlando Weekly Press Club

Local journalism is information. Information is power. And we believe everyone deserves access to accurate independent coverage of their community and state. Our readers helped us continue this coverage in 2020, and we are so grateful for the support.

Help us keep this coverage going in 2021. Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing membership pledge, your support goes to local-based reporting from our small but mighty team.

Join the Orlando Weekly Press Club for as little as $5 a month.