DJ Craze and others set to pay tribute to Big Makk at Backbooth

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COURTESY FUTURE ARTISTS
  • Courtesy Future Artists
We don’t need to rehash how bad 2016 was for musician deaths, but it’s important to recognize that the bizarre wave of death that swept the globe touched down locally too. Big Makk (neé Samisoni Koroitamudu), known for curating the tropical booty-thumping Shake N Bass night at Backbooth, died in a car crash in August. He was only 22 years old, but had released tracks on respected labels like Dim Mak and Mad Decent. Tonight, Backbooth pays tribute to the beloved DJ with a party in his honor. DJ Craze, a three-time DMC world champion with major old-school turntablism skills, headlines. But the night is all about Makk, with all proceeds going to the Big Makk Foundation, which provides scholarships for young adults who want to pursue careers in the music industry, ensuring that Big Makk’s name lives on.

with DJ Craze, K1K0, Ivarr, Ma-Less, Mezmriz, OG Nacho | 11:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16 | Backbooth, 37 W. Pine St. | 407-999-2570 | backbooth.com | $10



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