Pulse shooter's widow Noor Salman will return to Orlando for trial

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Noor Salman, the widow of Pulse nightclub gunman Omar Mateen, has agreed to come back to Florida to face federal charges.

According to NBC Bay Area, court documents show that Salman will be transferred from California to the Middle District of Florida's Orlando Division by U.S. Marshals at an unknown time.



Salman was scheduled for a court hearing in California on Monday, April 10, to fight her transfer to Florida, but documents filed on Tuesday show that she has waived the right to that hearing and decided to return to Orlando.

After the Pulse attack Salman moved to California to live with her parents.



In January, she was arrested at her parents' home and charged with aiding and abetting, as well as obstruction of justice for her role in the mass shooting of June 12, 2016, that left 49 dead at the gay nightclub Pulse.

Salman has pleaded not guilty to the charges, but prosecutors believe that she had knowledge that her husband would carry out the Pulse attack.

In March, a federal judge in Oakland ruled that Salman could be released from the Santa Rita jail she was being held at on a $500,000 bond, but that decision was blocked by Orlando U.S. District Judge Paul Byron.

If convicted of both charges, Salman could face life in prison.

It is still unclear when and where the trial in Florida will actually be held.

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