O.J. Simpson wants to move back to Florida

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SCREENGRAB VIA ESPN
  • Screengrab via ESPN
O.J. Simpson was granted parole Thursday afternoon for his role in a 2007 confrontation over sports memorabilia, and now he says he plans to move back to his home in Florida.

Appearing as inmate No. 1027820, Simpson told the Nevada Board of Parole that he plans to return to the state he once lived before going to prison nearly nine years ago, reports ESPN.

Simpson, who is now 70 years old, served nine years of a nine-to-33 year sentence for 12 charges including assault, robbery and kidnapping.

Simpson could now be released from prison as soon as Oct. 1.

In 2007, Simpson was arrested for enlisting armed men to retrieve stolen autographed footballs and various other sports merchandise from a room in a Las Vegas hotel.

Simpson was granted parole in 2013, but was not released from prison.

After the verdict was released, Simpson joked, "I could easily stay in Nevada, but I don't think you guys want me here." A board member then responded, "No comment, sir."

According to ABC News, moving back to his old house may prove difficult, considering the home that Simpson lived in before going to prison, located in Kendall just south of Miami, is now being listed for close to $1.3 million.

Simpson bought the home in 2000, five years after being acquitted for the murder of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman.

The Florida Department of Corrections has since released a statement following Simpson's request to move back to the Sunshine State.
According to the Miami New Times, Simpson wasn't exactly on his best behavior while living in Florida. Back in 2002, he was caught illegally boating in a manatee zone, and he was fined $25,000 for illegally pirating DirecTV channels to his house in 2005.

Also in that same year he told The New York Post that he accepted free drugs from strangers:

"You can't go to the bathrooms in [South Beach] clubs without somebody saying, 'Juice, you want a hit?' You always get people handing you something. It might be a line of coke with a phone number [in case] you want more,"

“[One] night, it was just pervasive. [So] you take it, put it in your pocket, drive home. Next day, I wake up and look over next to my bed. I had two things I assume were ecstasy pills, a couple of things I assume were cocaine, and one little package of pot. All of them had phone numbers on them. All I could think was, If I got stopped by the cops drivin’ home and told them I didn’t know that was in my pocket, who’s gonna believe that? Only way to avoid it is I don’t go to South Beach anymore!”


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