The Orlando Sentinel has published arguably the worst letter to the editor in existence

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Congratulations to the Orlando Sentinel for publishing arguably the crappiest take on the #MeToo movement.

In a letter to the editor posted on Nov. 20, Diane Panacek of Altamonte Springs managed to top millions of terrible Tweets and Facebook posts with an epic rant titled "Get off the #MeToo bandwagon," which basically says that women should be grateful for sexual predators.

Never mind that the entire "#MeToo bandwagon" is based on the fact that being labeled as a victim is incredibly stigmatizing, and that by having others come forward it destigmatizes the word. But most importantly the movement removes power from those who abuse it.

It seems all of that is lost on Diane. She also seems to think that #MeToo is just about sexual harassment at work, as her letter completely erases the millions of women using the hashtag to tell stories of violent stranger attack, spousal assault, familial abuse and date rape.

The letter somehow tops the Sentinel's "Orlando is too gay" op-ed from last June (great work, Diane!) and is so amazingly vile, so jam-packed with whiffs of Bill O'Reilly-esque excuses, that it's worth discussing at length.

Here are a few of the more awful tidbits:
"Since the attacks/exposure of Harvey Weinstein and many others, all kinds of women have been accusing, and asserting sexual harassment — even rape. It's mind-boggling. Many of the charges are decades old."
Right, because sexual assault and the damage it does has an expiration date.
"The women who are in the process of destroying and ruining their former mentors’ careers and reputations gained incredible perks, carved out great careers and were rewarded with riches untold. Now, we are to feel compassion for these shrinking violets, whose free will was taken from them. "
Right, in exchange for "great careers" and "riches untold," all these women had to do was keep their mouths shut so some creepy guy could get his rocks off. This is a great lesson for our kids. (Also, WTF: If every women who endured sexual assault were "rewarded with riches untold" ... well, the Forbes 400 would look a lot different.)
"I understand the women had an incredibly difficult choice. However, one who truly has high moral standards would have walked away from disgusting actions, vulgar and vile scenarios, etc. Some things are not worth 'selling out for' — not everyone does."
Right, only people of "high moral standards" know to "walk away" from sexual predators. As if it's that easy. Thank you, Diane. (If only I'd known I could just walk away from that knife that was held to my throat! Guess my standards just weren't high enough.)
"In defense of the undoubtedly vile, disgusting, talented men, they may have surmised that since there was no public outcry that the women involved were not entirely against anything and career goals took precedence."
Right, how were these "talented men" supposed to know right from wrong if the women they prey on don't teach them?
"It's so easy to accuse beneath the cover of anonymity. "He says; she says." Bring charges and speak up when it happens — not 20 years later."
There it is, folks.

So, if you're curious on how long you have to report a sexual deviant, according to Diane, it's sometime between getting cornered by your boss and 20 years, and if your career was taken to new heights because your "talented" mentor wanted you to watch him jack off, then just shut up and enjoy your "untold riches." And if you suffered anything more physically intrusive than a work situation ... well, just shut up because Diane thinks it's your own damn fault.
If there has ever been a "dumber" concept, I don’t know what it could be.
If there has ever been a "dumber" letter, we don't know what it could be.


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