More than 600 people were treated for jellyfish stings at Volusia County beaches last weekend

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The jellyfish were out in force last weekend.

Lifeguards at Volusia County beaches treated a grand total of 630 people last Saturday and Sunday for jellyfish stings, with 523 of them treated on Sunday alone, according to WFTV.



In 2014, nearly 200 people were stung at Daytona Beach over the course of a weekend. Just two weeks prior, more than 400 swimmers along New Smyrna Beach and Daytona Beach met with the same fate. Capt. Tammy Marris of Volusia County Beach Safety told Reuters that the numbers of sting victims and size of the jellyfish swarm isn't unusual.

It's possible that the sea creatures are making numbers along the shore due to hurricane season. A 2012 study suggested that rising sea temperatures impact the arrival and departure of jellyfish, posing a potential danger to the public.



UF Health officials advise the public to rinse the infected site with vinegar and salt or ocean water, avoiding rubbing sand or applying pressure to the area. Lifeguards typically have vinegar available to treat injured swimmers.

If you get stung by a jellyfish, do yourself a favor and don't urinate on it. It will do more harm than good, no matter what Friends says.

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