You should definitely check the beach report before heading to the Florida coast this weekend

by

comment
PHOTO VIA ADOBE IMAGES
  • Photo via Adobe Images
Right now, it would appear that just about every inch of Florida's coastline is dealing with something awful.

Earlier this month, more than 600 people were treated for jellyfish stings in a single weekend at Volusia County beaches. Since then, a grand total of 3,200 stings have been reported.



Down the Atlantic coast, some beaches are covered in a thick blanket of seaweed. The University of South Florida's Optical Oceanography Laboratory recently recorded more than 1,000 miles of sargassum seaweed covering South Florida waters via satellite photos. The Sun-Sentinel reported that tourists and residents in Delray Beach have been seen wading through the gunk, despite the risk of getting scratched or catching sea lice.

On the other side of the peninsula, the west coast is plagued by a bout of red tide, a harmful algal bloom that produces toxic chemicals and affects both marine and human life. High concentrations of red tide are cause for concern, but the organism's growth is natural in the Gulf of Mexico.
PHOTO VIA FWC
  • Photo via FWC
So before you pack your car up and head to the beach this weekend, do yourself a favor and look up the beach conditions.



Stay on top of Orlando news and views. Sign up for our weekly Headlines newsletter.

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Orlando Weekly. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Orlando Weekly, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at feedback@orlandoweekly.com.

Orlando Weekly works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Central Florida.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Orlando’s true free press free.