Florida Sen. Marco Rubio learns about his Spanish heritage on episode of 'Finding Your Roots'

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U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio learned some surprising tidbits about his Spanish ancestors in the latest episode of Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis Gates Jr. on PBS.

The Cuban American lawmaker found out he's not the first person in his family to become a lawyer or engage in public service. More than 200 years ago, Rubio's third great grandfather, José de Reina y Tosta, got his law degree from Spain's University of Granada in 1786.



Rubio's ancestor went on to become a public prosecutor in Seville by 1793. Two centuries later, Rubio's parents immigrated from Cuba to the U.S. in 1956, and Rubio was born in Miami in 1971.

"That's unreal – that's really amazing," Rubio tells Gates in a small clip of the show. "It's the first time I read anywhere that anybody in my family had anything to do with government up until me."




The show featuring Rubio also explores the family histories of U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard and former U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan.

The Finding Your Roots episode with Rubio will air Tuesday, Feb. 12 at 8 p.m.

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