Governor Ron DeSantis proposes using portion of Florida's federal coronavirus relief funds on job training program

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PHOTO VIA NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA
  • Photo via News Service of Florida

Gov. Ron DeSantis is asking lawmakers to approve creating two workforce education programs by using $75 million in federal coronavirus relief funds.

Speaking at a news conference Monday in Melbourne, DeSantis pitched using the money to launch what he’s calling the “Get There Faster Initiatives."



The proposed programs, one to serve high school students and another for adults, are aimed at speeding up pathways to receiving certificates and credentials for jobs. DeSantis is recommending $50 million in federal money go toward covering costs for high school students to participate in workforce college-credit or career dual-enrollment programs at state colleges and technical colleges.

A website launched by the Florida Department of Education touting the initiative said there are 17 career pathways available through courses at the institutions. The other $25 million would be allocated toward helping adults enroll in workforce education programs at the institutions.



“It will also support adults needing to enter a high-quality training program to acquire a job-ready credential of value,” a news release from the governor’s office said.

Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran, who appeared with DeSantis, said the initiative could help the nearly 1.8 million adults in Florida who don’t have high-school diplomas.

“Whatever it is that’s keeping you from getting that credential of value, we’re going to cover it,” Corcoran said.

DeSantis said he would rather work with the Legislature to get the programs off the ground than do so through executive action.


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