News & Features » News

Fly in the ointment

comment

At one time Orlando International Airport planners predicted a 5.8 increase in passengers from 1997 to 1998. In October they realized the growth would be more like 2 percent. Ends up even that modest goal wasn't met. The airport handled almost 27.8 million passengers during 1998, or 1.6 percent more than it did in 1997.

The number of international passengers using Orlando's airport decreased, mostly due to Sanford Airport luring away foreign air-charter business. The trade journal World Airport Week in its Feb. 9 issue calls Sanford a "scrappy little airport" that has "forced the larger facility to lower its landing fees and include more passenger-friendly facilities in its $2 billion expansion."

"Sanford has done a good job of exploiting an opportunity," Egerton van den Berg, executive director of the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority, grudgingly told World Airport Week. Indeed. Sanford expects to handle 1.3 million international charter passengers in 1999, whereas Orlando anticipates just 600,000.


We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Orlando Weekly. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Orlando Weekly, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at feedback@orlandoweekly.com.

Orlando Weekly works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Central Florida.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Orlando’s true free press free.