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Opening in Orlando: Serenity, Cold War and more

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Opening this week:

Cold War Director Pawel Pawlikowski won the Best Director award at Cannes for this black-and-white portrait of the love affair between a vocalist (Joanna Kulig) and a composer (Tomasz Kot) that begins in Poland in the 1940s and ends up spanning two decades. Pawlikowski says he based the couple in part on his own parents, but the movie has been getting equal plaudits for its depiction of life in the Soviet era. How tough were things back then? Pretty tough, apparently. Even if you were an up-and-coming singer with a promising career in front of you, you still had to sleep on a Kot. (R; tentatively scheduled to open Friday at Enzian Theater, Maitland)

The Kid Who Would Be King Attack the Block's Joe Cornish directs a young-adult take on Arthurian legendry, with a modern-day British kid discovering it's his destiny to form a new Knights of the Round Table. Patrick Stewart plays Merlin, while the title role is filled by Andy Serkis' kid, Louis Ashbourne Serkis (who must be hoping this flick makes him a household name in his own right, so he doesn't have to listen to any more paparazzi whispering "Isn't that Precious?"). (PG)

Serenity What would you do if your ex-wife approached you about killing her new husband? Would you run to the cops, or would you instead salute her for her clear and fervent desire to Kondo the crap out of her personal life? That's the quandary facing Matthew McConaughey in this thriller. And if he says yes to the scheme, only to get caught, he can always tell the judge that he didn't commit premeditated homicide to be cool. He didn't do it to make a statement. He just liked it. (R)

Also playing:

Burning The Florida Film Critics Circle (including our own Cameron Meier) named Steven Yeun the best supporting actor of 2018 for his performance as one-third of a romantic triangle in this Korean-made mystery. And let me tell ya, winning an award like that can do great things for a guy's Korea. Nyuk nyuk. (NR; playing through Thursday at Enzian Theater, Maitland)

Canal Street Set If Beale Street Could Talk on a different street in a different city (Chicago) and add a layer of Christian proselytizing, and maybe you'd come up with something like this wannabe-inspirational drama, in which a father fights to clear his son of killing a white classmate. His novel legal strategy: proving Matthew McConaughey did it. Thank you, Jesus; thank you, Lord. (PG-13; playing at Regal Waterford Lakes Stadium 20 & IMAX)